Facebook Twitter Pinterest Bathers at Hampstead Ponds Hampstead Heath. Photograph: David Levene/The GuardianOn a normal sunny summer’s day there is always a nucleus of the regulars. How do they manage to spend their afternoons “cooking themselves like bits of steak,” as Professor Joad, himself a frequent visitor, once put it. They work at Reuters at night, or they are dentists with well-arranged surgeries, or racing car drivers. A few may be lesser novelists. Quite a lot are full-time sun-worshippers. They bring little pieces of carpet to lie on, bottles of tea and coffee and cold lunch, and evil mixtures of homemade sun lotion. Some have manuscripts. A common sight is the man who stands on his head in the corner, motionless for two hours or more – a yoga enthusiast perhaps. Another does handstands on one hand, slowly raising and lowering his body. Frequently, bodies are contorted in weird positions. This is not for the sake of any religious cult. They are tanning those last four inches of armpit to complete the overall effect.

PUNKT MP01

Facebook Twitter Pinterest Punkt MP01: peculiar and appealing. Photograph: Katherine Anne Rose/The Observerpunkt.ch, £229

The phone that ignited this debate is something of an absurdity. Its unique selling point is that it does nothing but ring people, text people and wake you up, yet it costs a small fortune. One of the foremost attributes of a dumbphone is that it doesn’t matter much if you drop it in a puddle or render it up to a thug at knifepoint, whereas the Punkt is a design accessory. I was expecting to dislike it on these grounds, but strangely I didn’t, because despite its paucity of features it is both peculiar and appealing. The trigger-happy predictive text, for example, is efficient, while the ringtones are cheerful and accurate simulacra of birdsong. More than that, it feels wonderful in the hand, only to be imperceptible in the pocket. Just how a phone should be.

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Party of Democratic Action SDA – centre-right

Alliance for a Better Future of Bosnia and Herzegovina SBB BiH -centre-right

Croatian, Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina HDZ BiH – centre-right

Croatian Democratic Union 1990 HDZ 1990 – centre-right

Alliance of Independent Social Democrats SNSD – centre-left (though in reality, nationalist)

Serb Democratic Party SDS – right-wing

Party positioning is indicative and to be viewed in the context and framework of the country’s politics.

There are 10 candidates for the post of Bosniak member of the three-member Presidency. Croats will be choosing between four candidates, while there are three candidates for the Serb seat.

The 2010 electionThe last general elections in Bosnia and Herzegovina were held in 2010. Turnout was 56%.

The clear winner in Republika Srpska entity was the Alliance of Independent Social Democrats, SNSD, with 43.3%, nearly twice as much as the SDS. In the Federation, the Social-democratic party, SDP, and the Party of Democratic Action, SDA, won 26% and 19.5% of the vote respectively. The largest Bosnian Croat political force was the Croatian Democratic Union, HDZ, with 11%. A six-party government (between the Social Democratic Party (SDP), the Party of Democratic Action(SDA), the Croatian Democratic Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina (HDZ), the Croatian Democratic Union 1990, the Serbian Democratic Party (SDS), and the Alliance of Independent Social Democrats (SNSD)) was eventually formed 15 months after the election.

The outgoing government and parliament have been dubbed the worst ever. 106 laws were adopted by parliament in the past four years, down from the 180 between 2006-2010. As a comparison, over the same period the Montenegrin government adopted about 350 laws, Serbia 500 and Croatia about 750.

In the tripartite presidency vote, the SNSD candidate Nebojsa Radmanovic was the clear winner among Serb voters, while the SDA candidate Bakir Izetbegovic prevailed as the Bosniak member of the Presidency, and the SDP candidate Zeljko Komsic emerged as the Croat member of the Presidency. The latter result was not welcomed among several right-wing Croat parties who accused Komsic of being elected by Bosniak voters.

“>A reminder of the wars in former Yugoslavia at the Newseum in Washington D.C. Photo: Alberto Nardelli for The Guardian.A country’s constitution and institutions are always a consequence of its history. In Bosnia and Herzegovina, the divisions of the past may have been frozen, but their complexity and scars remain deeply enshrined in how the country’s parliament and government are elected and organised.

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